Mzwakhe Mbuli biography: age, wife, net worth, poems, son

Mzwakhe Mbuli (born 1 August 1959 in Sophiatown) is a popular South African poet and singer. He has also held a notable position in the Christian path. 

He was a Deacon at Apostolic Faith Mission Church located in Naledi, Soweto. He is also the father of the upcoming singer and dancer Mzwakhe Mbuli junior aka. Robot Boii.

Mzwakhe’s political beliefs and opinions have made many haunt him several times.

Profile

Mzwakhe Mbuli biography
Mzwakhe Mbuli is a popular poet and singer and was a Deacon at Apostolic Faith Mission Church located in Naledi, Soweto.
NameMzwakhe Mbuli
Born1 August 1959 (age 62)
Sophiatown, South Africa
GenderMale
NationalitySouth African
WifeThembeka Ndaba (m. 2010-?)
Zukiswa Damse (m. 2015)
SonMzwakhe Mbuli junior
OccupationSinger, Poet
Net worth$1 million (2021)

Background

The former deacon was born Mzwakhe Mbuli on 1 August 1959 in Sophiatown, aka Sof’town or Kofifi, a suburb of Johannesburg. He was welcomed into the family of Elijah Katali and Roselinah Msuthukazi Mbuli.

Together with his parents and siblings, they had to relocate to Soweto after their hometown was bulldozed in 1966. His father made a notable impact on his life.

Elijah trained his son Mzwakhe in traditional mbube songs and took him along a series of mbube sessions conducted by workers.

He attended theatre groups both locally and school-based. During his days as a youth, he also went to Zulu dance festivals. He also attended music events during his youth days.

Career

Mzwakhe Mbuli background
Mzwakhe Mbuli has performed in countries outside the shores of South Africa helping him gain ground in the internationality circle.

Mzwakhe Mbuli started his career following the Soweto Uprising in June 1976. After a few years, he held performance as a member Khuyhangano for the COSAS.

Ever since he has held performances both within the country and across borders. He has gained prominence both in South Africa and abroad.

His first underground album was recorded in 1986. The tracks it contained had influence among the revolutionary groups. This made the apartheid government ban the album.

Poems

Mzwakhe Mbuli always expresses his views through his poems. Here is a list of his poems in alphabetical order; 

  • Change is Pain
  • Don’t Push Us Too Far
  • Education Hijack
  • Ignorant
  • Let Me Remember
  • Pitoli
  • Sies
  • The Noble Charter

Songs

His lyrics contain past events in the country that occurred in the twenties (80s-90s). Below are some of Mzwakhe Mbuli’s songs in alphabetical order;

  • Africa Sing
  • Emandulo
  • Giya
  • God Bless Africa
  • God The Best
  • Ivangeli Lakudala
  • Kwazulu Natali
  • Madiba
  • No Love No Life
  • Piloti
  • Song for God
  • The Day Shall Dawn
  • Ukulimala Kwenqondo
  • Voice of Reason

Wife

Mzwakhe Mbuli is married to Zukiswa Damse. He met his beautiful wife and the love of his life in 2015.

After meeting her in Mogale City West of Jozi, they started a relationship that year, he proposed, got a “yes!” reply, and they exchanged their marital vows in August 2015.

Before getting married to Zukiswa, he was husband to Thembeka Ndaba. In 2010, they had a traditional marriage in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

Net worth

The singer is a notable personality in the country’s music circle. He has made a name for himself and in return recorded huge profits.

According to the South African News site Briefly, Mzwakhe Mbuli has an estimated net worth of $1 million (2021).

Albums

1986Change is Pain
2009KwaZulu Natal
2006All the Hits
2008Tribute to Mandela
2013Patriotic Love
1993Africa
2009The Voice of Reason
2007Thunder (Ladum’Izulu)
2015Greatest Hits: Born Free But Always in Chains
2009Izigi (footsteps)
1989Unbroken Spirit
2012Amandla
2018The Best of Mzwakhe Mbuli
2009Mbulism
1992Resistance is Defence
2015Umzwakhe Ubonga Ujehova

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